CDRI Marks Three Decades of Research to Help Develop the Nation

Cambodian Development Resource Institute is celebrating 30 years of business, helping raise the nation out of poverty while contributing to its socioeconomic growth
Boasting five research centres countrywide, CDRI has spent the last 30 years carrying out various forms of research that have provided data to help shape Cambodia’s development. Kiripost/supplied
Boasting five research centres countrywide, CDRI has spent the last 30 years carrying out various forms of research that have provided data to help shape Cambodia’s development. Kiripost/supplied

Cambodian Development Resource Institute (CDRI) has marked three decades of operations, playing a key role in the nation’s socio-economic development by contributing to its research landscape.

Boasting five research centres countrywide, CDRI has spent the last 30 years carrying out various forms of research that have provided data to help shape Cambodia’s development. It works in various fields, including agriculture, economics, education, environment, and governance.

“Research is formulated and produced by Cambodian teams in close and direct partnership with Cambodia’s key government and development actors, from the early stages of research design to implementation and policy uptake,” CDRI’s Executive Director, Dr Eng Netra, said in a statement issued to mark the milestone.

“This kind of thorough investment in bringing policymakers on board in the research process has built local ownership of the research findings and benefited the landscape by informing and shaping debates and formulations throughout Cambodia’s major policy development process,” she added.

She went on to pay tribute to the people behind the research, who have contributed to the institute’s success since its inception.

“Without the staff’s commitment to CDRI’s core values, especially its focus on worthwhile contribution and accountability to the development of Cambodia and the Greater Mekong Subregion, the progress in knowledge creation and policy engagement achievements of the last 30 years would not have been possible,” Eng Netra said.

Looking ahead, with regard to ASEAN’s growing influence on the global stage, he said cooperation between nations is key. “Climate change, reliance on global supply chains, and the challenges of Covid-19 make this clear,” she added.

She remarked that by building partnerships with regional nations through joint research and policy dialogues, CDRI is playing a crucial role in developing a “knowledge-sharing ecosystem” that is beneficial to stakeholders regionwide.

“CDRI’s collaboration with ASEAN countries contributes to enhanced understanding, respect and interaction among institutions and people who play influential roles in informing and shaping the direction of their respective countries and ASEAN as a whole. These efforts can help develop the mutually beneficial relationships that will be so necessary in the future,” Eng Netra noted.

She believes this is where CDRI has a role to play, with its research and policy influencing platforms, such as the Annual Outlook Conference, providing guidance and policy evidence for key policymakers to debate and share knowledge with regard to Cambodia’s future directions and pressing issues.

“As such, CDRI will continue to provide a home to committed researchers and nurture a knowledge-sharing community for the betterment of the country,” she concluded.